Mr Rick O’Shea

Patrick O’Shea has been involved with Careif as an Honorary Patron for 10 years. Patrick is also a Director of a Construction Company that has been established for 38 years.

Rick, said of his trustee role: “Careif is undertaking ground breaking work within mental health and I’m pleased to have been able to support the Charity as best I can over the years.”

Dr Jed Boardman

Dr Jed Boardman is visiting Senior Lecturer in Social Psychiatry at the Institute of Psychiatry and Senior Policy Adviser at the Centre for Mental Health and. Throughout his career, he has worked mainly in social and community psychiatry and was Consultant Psychiatrist at South London and Maudsley Trust until 2016. Since March 2018 he has worked as a Medically Qualified Tribunal Member. First-tier Tribunal. Social Security and Child Support Appeal Tribunals (PIP and ESA), based in London.

He was Chair of the General and Community Faculty of the Royal College of Psychiatrists and is now lead for Social Inclusion at the Royal College of Psychiatrists where he advises on employment, poverty, welfare reform, personalisation and recovery. He chaired the Royal College of Psychiatrists Social Inclusion Scoping Group and in 2010 published a book on Social Inclusion and Mental Health. He recently co-chaired the RCPsych Person-Centred Training and Curriculum (PCTC) Scoping Group and was an author of their 2018 report on person-centred care and training.

He has published widely on Social and Community Psychiatry. He led the Recovery projects at the Centre for Mental Health and, with other colleagues, set up the ImROC (Implementing Recovery through Organisational Change) project. His research interests include the Epidemiology of Mental Disorders, Psychological Disorders in General Practice, Evaluation of Psychiatric Services, Recovery and Employment. His main international work has been in Uganda, where he has worked with local colleagues to promote knowledge, research and service improvements.

Careif Global Position Statement Religion and Spirituality in Mental Health Care

Careif is an international mental health charity that works towards protecting and promoting mental health and resilience, to eliminate inequalities and strengthen social justice. Our principles include working creatively with humility and dignity, and with balanced partnerships in order to ensure all cultures and societies play their part in our mission of protecting and promoting mental health and wellbeing. We do this by respecting the traditions of all world societies, whilst believing traditions can evolve, for even greater benefit to individuals and society.

Read more: Careif Global Position Statement Religion and Spirituality in Mental Health Care

Careif Global Position Statement Stigma Mental Illness Diversity

Careif is an international mental health charity that works towards protecting and promoting mental health, wellbeing, resilience and resourcefulness with a special focus to eliminate inequalities and strengthen social justice. Our principles include working creatively with humility, dignity and balanced partnerships in order to ensure that all cultures and societies play their part in our mission of protecting and promoting mental health and wellbeing. We do this by respecting the traditions of all world societies, whilst believing that culture and traditions can evolve for even greater benefit to individuals and society.

Read more: Careif Global Position Statement Stigma Mental Illness Diversity PDF

BME Inside/Outside NIMHE Report

In 1999, the National Service Framework or the NHS Plan for Mental Health in England, highlighted but did not addressed the particular needs of black and minority ethnic groups. In response to these policy imperatives, the growing political awareness and discourse around institutionalised racism, and consistent data showing adverse pathways into and through care for ethnic groups. In 2003 the Department of Health (UK) launched a national strategy with proposals for reforming the service experiences and service outcomes of people from black and minority ethnic groups who experience mental ill health.

This archived seminal policy document on black and minority ethnic communities and mental health care, is here for easier access to those interested. It is now difficult to access from DH archive by a weblink. This is possibly the only place Inside/Outside NIMHE can be found.

BME Inside Outside

Careif Co-Founder announces new national centre of excellence

Lankelly Chase Foundation has commissioned Queen Mary University of London, the University of Manchester and Words of Colour Productions to establish an independent centre of excellence on ethnic inequalities, severe mental illness and multiple disadvantage.

With a strategic award of £1,245,000, the Synergi Collaborative Centre will deliver a five-year national programme, focused on working towards the transformation of health services for ethnic minority people with severe mental illness.

Over the five years the centre will:

  • Collate, interpret and communicate data and knowledge on ethnic inequalities in mental health and related systems, and how this relates to severe and multiple disadvantage.
  • Bring together the full range of stakeholders through models of co-production, and co-curation of knowledge, to develop and implement solutions.
  • Place lived experience narratives centre stage.
  • Use creative, digital and evidence-based platforms to share these narratives.
  • Become a focal point for action, leading to systems change regarding ethnic inequalities in mental health services.
  • Identify opportunities to reduce and prevent ethnic inequalities to improve the health of individuals and populations.

The centre will take a collaborative approach, using the principles of co-production of knowledge and a creative mix of robust research methods.

Kamaldeep Bhui CBE, Professor of Cultural Psychiatry & Epidemiology, Queen Mary University of London, and Careif Co-Founder, said: “The Synergi Collaborative Centre will assemble all sections of society to offer a fresh perspective on ethnic inequalities in severe mental illness, while taking account of the multiple disadvantages which act as drivers of inequalities. This area has secured little effective action due to disagreements about the evidence, sensitivities around accusations of racism and minimising the lived experience of ethnic inequalities. By capturing experiences of multiple disadvantage throughout the life course, the centre will inform the production of co-created narratives, which will be widely shared to drive systems’ reform.”

To read the full release, visit www.synergicollaborativecentre.co.uk.